Plain Words about “Islamist Extremism”
By Sean Gabb
(June 2014)

According to The Daily Telegraph, “[o]ne of the most serious challenges facing [England] is that of tackling religious extremism.” Apparently, some of the Moslems here are attempting “to seal Islamic communities off hermetically from the rest of society.” They are taking over state schools in the areas where they are settled, and imposing on them their own ideas of curriculum and behaviour. Girls are made to sit at the back of the class. Evolution is not taught. Christmas and Easter are not celebrated. Instead, there is fasting during Ramadan, and the call to prayer sounds through the playground. We are all supposed to think this very wicked and in need of action by the British State.

I disagree. Mass-immigration has not, by any reasonable standard, been a success. Even before it started, anyone with half a brain could have seen what was coming. Many people did see, and only stiff laws and a controlled media have been enough to keep the volume of complaint to a low rumble. It may be encouraging that the ruling class has finally chosen to notice and deplore some of the consequences. But I am not encouraged. The media drumbeat against “Islamist extremism” and “radicalisation” is not, I think, the prelude not to a frank discussion of where we are, but to the finishing off of what freedom remains in this country.

The phrase “Islamist extremism” may be fair comment. The mosques do seem to be filling up with ranting clerics, and with young men in beards who hang on their every word. More disturbing, though, than this change in itself is how politicians and the media have agreed to analyse it in quasi-medical terms. For example, Ofsted – a body set up by the Blair Government to control both public and private education – is claiming that schools do too little to “keep students safe from the risks associated with extremist views.”

Boris Johnson, the “Conservative” Mayor of London, goes further. For him, “[t]he most important question now is how we prevent other young men, and women, from succumbing to that awful virus: the contagion of radical Islamic extremism.”

Some respect has always been paid in England to the right to hold and communicate opinions. Epidemic diseases, on the other hand, are a matter of public health – of quarantine and vaccination, and even of compulsory treatment. Insist firmly enough that opinions are an illness, and censorship and brainwashing become therapy.

And, if unwelcome, these are opinions. Let us look at the nature of “Islamist extremism.” Its core message can be expressed in three propositions:

1. That the British State is committed to an American-led campaign of war and destabilisation throughout the Islamic world, and shares responsibility for millions of civilian deaths and maimings there;

2. That it is the duty of Moslems everywhere to come to the aid of their brothers and sisters when they are attacked;

3. That modern British society is so degenerate that the only moral response is to keep away from it.

These are not unreasonable propositions. The first is obviously true. After 1945, we put much of the Islamic world under the sway of brutally despotic puppet regimes, and kept these in place with arms and diplomatic support. More recently, we have been systematically replacing these regimes with failed states. You need to be stupid or a liar to claim that the Islamic world has any inherent capacity for liberal democracy. But if it has become a row of slagheaps reeking with human blood, that is largely our fault.

The second proposition is at least creditable. I wish it were interpreted less often as a duty for young men to blow themselves up in railway carriages, or to murder off-duty soldiers. To be fair, though, it hardly ever is. No one can say that the Moslems are harmoniously integrated into our national life. But the half dozen terrorist acts they have committed in all the years they have been settled among us are nothing set against the campaign of atrocity waged against us by Sinn Fein/IRA. So long as it is displayed with prudence, solidarity with your own is a fine thing. We might usefully learn some for the support of our kith and kin in Southern Africa and of our fellow Christians in places like Egypt and Pakistan.

Anyone who doubts the third proposition should try watching some British television, or looking at our newspapers. It may be that memorising reams of Koranic verses in Arabic will tend to narrow the understanding. But there are worse ways to bring up a child.

Our ruling class disagrees. The Education Secretary, Michael Gove – another “Conservative” – holds to the public health analysis. He has decreed that children are, by way of vaccination, to be taught “British values,” and that these include “democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect, and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs.”

Fine words – a pity about their meaning. In modern England, democracy is the right to choose between competing sets of rogues, all with identical policies. The rule of law resides in half a million pages of chicanery and oppression. Individual liberty? The question mark alone answers that one. Respect and tolerance? Ditto. The “British values” children are to have rammed down their throats are nothing more than a duty of boundless obedience to the ruling class. Perhaps this has always been one of the functions of state education. But I cannot think of a ruling class in English history more risible in its quality, or hostile to the interests and values of ordinary people.

The Moslems are to be vaccinated out of their opinions. If that fails, they are to be medicated with the theft of their children. See Boris Johnson again: “A child may be taken into care if he or she is being exposed to pornography, or is being abused – but not if the child is being habituated to this utterly bleak and nihilistic view of the world that could lead them to become murderers.” Warming to his theme, he continues: “The law should obviously treat radicalisation as a form of child abuse. It is the strong view of many of those involved in counter-terrorism that there should be a clearer legal position, so that those children who are being turned into potential killers or suicide bombers can be removed into care – for their own safety and for the safety of the public.”

On the face of it, this is not an idle threat. The British State has a settled appetite for stealing children from their parents. In 2013, it even allowed its officials to cause an international incident. Allesandra Pacchieri, an Italian woman, came to England while heavily pregnant to attend a training course. She was a little too honest with the airport security about her mental health. Arrested and driven to a hospital, she was held down by the police, while social workers ordered the doctors to perform a caesarean. The child was taken straightaway into care. Despite outrage from the Italian authorities, she has never seen her child, and it has now been adopted by unnamed strangers.

Or there is the peculiar case of two Slovak Gypsy children. After allegations of “neglect,” they were taken from their parents and given for adoption by a homosexual couple. The parents went into court, claiming that homosexuality was regarded in their culture as an abomination, and that the children should be given back. Their case was dismissed by Lord Justice Munby, President of the Family Division. He explained that, while any judge should “respect the opinions of those who come here from a foreign land,” he had to judge matters according to English law and by reference to “the standards of reasonable men and women in contemporary English society.”

This is one of those cases that leaves you scratching your head. Does it show the current positioning here within the pc “hierarchy of the oppressed?” Do gay rights now trump anti-racism? Or is it an inventive way of telling East European Gypsies to go away and find some other rich country to pay their welfare benefits? Whatever the answer, Mr Johnson’s call for Moslem children to be stolen from their parents may be worth taking seriously.

Or is it? Look again at Proposition 2 above. Moslems believe in solidarity, and they practise solidarity. In August 2007, Haroon Zafaryab returned from prayers in a North London mosque to find that his car had been clamped, and that he would have to pay a £100 fine, plus £265 to have it released. He refused to pay and sat in his car, taking advantage of a law that prevents a vehicle from being towed away whole someone is inside it. For the next thirty hours, he and the clamping authorities faced each other down. His other three wheels were clamped, and he was given more parking tickets that added up to £3,565. Mr Zafaryab got the full support of his community. Dozens of people stood round his car. Others brought him food and drink. In the end, the authorities accepted a token payment of £100, before running away.

When did a native Englishman last get this level of support? More to the point, can you imagine how many armed police would be needed to cover the removal of one child from a family of Islamic enthusiasts? For all they may huff and puff, the rulers of this country are cowards. They are willing to preside over mass-murder abroad. Threaten them with a good riot here, and they always back down.

So, what actually is happening with all this propaganda about opinions as a matter of public health? Well, I have limited evidence, but I do suspect that the apparent panic over “Islamist extremism” is a front for something else. This something else is probably a set of laws and procedures to legitimise the theft of children from white dissidents.

Though the BNP has collapsed, the UK Independence Party is doing well. Ignoring it has failed. Lies about its leaders and policies have failed. An alternative strategy would be to attack its activist base. This has already been attempted. In 2013, Rotherham City Council removed three children from the care of foster parents who were known UKIP activists. The officials said this presented a “safeguarding issue for the children.” On this occasion, the Council had to step back – uttering the usual claim that “lessons had been learned.” But the secret of government in this country is that the authorities are concentrated and homogenous in their opinions. We natives are mostly atomised and indifferent to what is done to others. Sooner or later, the war on “Islamist extremism” will be revealed as the fraud that it largely is. Then the inquisition our rulers are setting up to public acclaim will be turned loose on its real object – namely us.

And so, I denounce the war on “Islamist extremism.” Anyone who thinks men like Michael Gove and Boris Johnson are standing up to political correctness is a fool – as big a fool as those who believe that diversity is strength.

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