Smoking, Class and the Legitimation of Power – Description

“The puritan hated bear baiting, not because it gave pain to the bear, but because it gave pleasure to the spectators.” T.B. Macaulay, 1848

The “War against Tobacco” is a fact of modern life. We have high taxes, bans on promotion, campaigns against smoking, and growing attempts to criminalise smoking outside the home — and even inside the home.

In this book, Sean Gabb shows that the war is part of a much larger project of lifestyle regulation by the ruling class, and that its function is to provide a set of plausible excuses for the extraction of resources from the people and for the exercise of power over them.

This is a class issue, and no discussion of tobacco policy can be complete without an understanding of the dynamics of class.

CONTENTS

  • INTRODUCTION: SMOKING, THE RULING CLASS AND LEGITIMATION DISCOURSE
    • LEGITIMISING THE STATE
    • THE SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF “SOCIAL PROBLEMS”
    • CLASS POWER AND CLASS LEGITIMATION
    • PATERNALISM AND CLASS LEGITIMATION
    • THE WAR AGAINST TOBACCO
    • THE FUTILITY OF THE TOBACCO COMPANIES
    • WRITINGS REVIEWED
    • RELIGION AND RESISTANCE
    • TEXTS IN CONTEXT
    • CHRIS TAME: HIS PART IN MY DOWNFALL!
  • FOREWORD TO THE SECOND EDITION
  • THE RIGHT TO SMOKE: AN HISTORICAL VIEW
    • I: A PURELY PRIVATE AFFAIR, BUT…
    • II: THE QUESTIONS
      • i: The Desired End of the Anti-smoking Movement
      • ii: The Intellectual Pedigree of the Anti-Smokers
      • iii: Whether the End can be Achieved
    • III: TOBACCO AND MANKIND
      • i: The European Discovery
      • ii: Smoking before Columbus
      • iii: Tobacco in America
      • iv: Its Spread Throughout the World
        • a: Portugal
        • b: France
        • c: Italy and Elsewhere
        • d: England
        • e: Turkey
        • f: India
        • g: Japan
        • h: China
        • j: Africa
      • iv: The Use of Tobacco: A Universal Custom
      • v: The Reasons for its Spread
        • a: Pleasurable Effects
        • b: The Alleged Medical Benefits
        • c: The Social Benefits
        • d: Religious Uses
    • IV: THE PERSECUTION OF TOBACCO — PART ONE
      • i: Spanish America
      • ii: Europe
      • iii: A Theological Excursus
      • iv: The Bible
      • v: The Law of Nature
      • vi: The Likeliest Reason
    • V: THE PERSECUTION OF TOBACCO — PART TWO
      • i: Germany
      • ii: Switzerland
      • iii: Russia
      • iv: Turkey
      • v: Japan
      • vi: England
      • vii: Tobacco Turns to Gold
    • VI: THE PERSECUTION OF TOBACCO — PART THREE
    • VII: THE MODERN PROSPECT
  • THE RIGHT TO SMOKE: A CHRISTIAN VIEW

    • INTRODUCTION
      • I: RELIGION, POLITICS AND MORALITY
      • II: IS SMOKING SINFUL?
      • III: THE NATURE OF MORALITY
      • IV: THE LIMITS OF REASON AND SCEPTICISM
      • V: FUNDAMENTALS OF CHRISTIAN THEISM
      • VI: NATURAL LAW AND MORALITY
      • VII: REASON AND REVELATION
      • VIII: SMOKING AND NATURAL LAW
      • IX:PLEASURE AND SIN: THE CHRISTIAN CASE AGAINST PURITANISM
      • X: THE ISSUE OF “ADDICTION”
      • XI: IS SMOKING “UNNATURAL”?
      • XII: IS SMOKING “SLOW SUICIDE”?
      • XIII: SMOKING, SIN AND TOLERATION
      • XIV: THE EVIL OF MORAL AUTHORITARIANISM
      • XV:CONCLUSIONS
  • THE RIGHT TO SMOKE: A CONSERVATIVE VIEW

    • I: THE RISKS OF SMOKING
    • II: … AND THE BENEFITS
    • III: THE ANTI-SMOKING LOBBY
    • IV: CONSERVATISM: THE PARTY OF FREEDOM
    • V: INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS
    • VI: ANTI-SMOKING AND ANTI-DEMOCRATIC ELITISMS
    • VII: SMOKING AND CLASS CONFLICT
    • VIII: SMOKING AND THE PHILOSOPHIC CASE FOR FREEDOM
    • IX: “EXTERNALITIES” AND THE ALLEGED GROUNDS FOR RESTRICTING LIBERTY
      • i: The NHS and the Costs of Smoking
      • ii: The Alleged Effects of “Passive Smoking”
    • X: SMOKING RESTRICTIONS: A CRITIQUE
      • i: Advertising and Free Speech
      • ii: The Counter-Productive Effect of High Tobacco Taxation
      • iii: Should Tobacco Companies Be Liable for Civil Damages?
      • iv: Restrictions on Public Smoking
    • XI: CONCLUSIONS
  • COMMERCIAL ADVERTISING: A THREATENED HUMAN RIGHT

    • INTRODUCTION
    • I: THE ATTACK ON ADVERTISING
      • i: The Health Activists
      • ii: The Feminists and Others
      • iii: The European Community
    • II: IN DEFENCE OF ADVERTISING
      • i: Freedom of Speech
      • ii: Whether Correct
      • iii: Whether False
      • iv: Whether Advertising Qualifies as Speech
      • v: J.S. Mill’s Ambiguity
      • vi: The American Courts
      • vii: No Reasonable Distinction
      • viii: No Unique Pecuniary Motive to Advertising
      • ix: A Practical Case for Admitting Some Advertising as Speech
      • x: Adverts Allow Other Forms of Speech
      • xi: Other Defences
        • Wider Consequences of Censorship
        • Overestimated Power of Advertising
        • The Economic Value of Advertising
        • Entrenchment of Oligopoly
        • Intolerance as Folly of the Weak
    • III: CONCLUSION
  • TOBACCO, CHILDREN AND ENTRAPMENT: A CASE FOR CONCERN?

    • PATERNALISTIC CHILD ABUSE
    • PARENTS AGAINST TOBACCO
    • AGENTS OF PROVOCATION
    • THE VALUE OF DUE PROCESS
    • ENTRAPMENT: AN INSTRUMENT OF DESPOTISM
    • PARENTS AGAINST TOBACCO: A CRIMINAL GANG?
  • SAVING THE KIDDIES, ENSLAVING ADULTS
  • THE PASSIVE SMOKING SCARE: WHEN RULING CLASS PROPAGANDA MASQUERADES AS SCIENCE
    • SCIENCE OR PROPAGANDA?
    • PROVING THE DANGER OF ACTIVE SMOKING
    • THE DANGER OF PASSIVE SMOKING
    • WHAT IS TO BE DONE?
  • INDEX

Sean Gabb is a writer and broadcaster whose novels have been translated into Italian, Spanish, Greek, Hungarian, Slovak and Chinese. He is Director of the Libertarian Alliance. He lives in Kent with his wife and daughter.

© 2011 – 2017, seangabb.

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Sean

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